A voicehearer’s path ~

Posts tagged ‘path’

Jesus, real or not?

jesus1Is Jesus (Y’shua) a real figure in history, or just a tool used by the “establishment” to control the masses? I can’t answer that one for you, you have to do the research yourself and come to your own conclusions. I know that I have come to some conclusions of my own, and will share them, but you must do your own. First, I do not see Y’shua as an actual Son of God, as I do not believe that God will take human form. I had already begun to question that when I did some digging into Jewish thought. You can see those thoughts on several very good websites, Jewfaq, Judaism 101, Aish.com, all are good. (Remember, there is no “pope” in the Jewish faith, so there are differing interpretations for all things God depending on the sect you question.) But, generally, Jews do not believe that God will incarnate, ever, in human form.

After I had done much research on those sites, and in questions to rabbis, I began to see Jesus as a rabbi, not God’s son. Now, to be honest, Jews do not see Y’shua as having been a particularly good rabbi, for he taught obedience to principles rather than the letter of the law. That is because Moses outlined the laws down to the very minutiae of daily living. It seems that the rabbi Y’shua was attempting to teach living by the principle of compassion. It was at the point at which I began to see this that I started to read the teachings of the Buddha. Now, I had been studying Y’shua’s words and thoughts for about 20 years, both as part of Evangelical MB1Christianity, (I was part of the fundamentalists), and outside the church, because I did not fit with the people with whom I was studying. My basic problems were that, though Y’shua taught a peaceful way of life, many from that particular sect were not inclined to Love. You can’t do that, and be faithful to Y’shua’s teachings.

What I encountered in Buddha’s teachings was so similar in principle that when you do a comparison of the two, you see many many parallels. So many that I needed to write them down, and did, in the post I have linked for you. In fact, the amount of parallels I found had me beginning to see Y’shua as another Buddha. The reason that is important to me is that you can pray to a Buddha, (essentially an enlightened human being) and recieve answers, both in advice and in help, for living a better way. In other words, if you pray in the name of Jesus, or Y’shua, his Greek and Hebrew names, the Spirit behind his enlightenment will help you.

The only reason this is important is that there are so many legitimate questions regarding the historicity of Jesus’ life, especially the way it is presented in the four gospels. There are many who question his very existence, so much so that it becomes important to see that it is what is at the core of his teachings that matters. He taught that we could become like him, he taught that we could do the things he did, and understand what was needed and that we could grow into that place he spiritualgrowthoccupied. That makes him a genuine son of man, not an offspring of God, but enlightened and willing to help us. So, when I pray, I still have Y’shua in mind, but think of him more as a Big Brother, than as God. My helper, my path teacher, if you will.

The remarkable thing in all of this is that, if you study Buddha’s teachings you will see that it doesn’t matter if there is a God or not. Buddha never taught about God, he was teaching a path that would lead humans out of suffering. He was teaching us that if we are compassionate toward all life, we will begin to find our own way out of the morrass of pain and suffering that is so much a part of the human existence. We could become a Buddha. I like that perspective so much that it no longer matters to me if you believe in God, so much as it matters to me if I am kind. It is not my business if you choose that path or not, it is my business to live my life following that path.

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Hatred, anger, interference, why?

MB1There was a question on Daily Buddhism that is one that baffles all who have entered a path of enlightenment, no matter the faith of origin or place in the world at large. When one makes choices that go contrary to the social “norm”, one is sometimes accosted by physically or verbally violent reactions from others. The question was how to deal with this. But my question for many years has simply been, why?

I come from a Christian background, but about 25 years ago gave up on the sect I was with, feeling that they could not or would not follow Y’shua’s teachings to love. The general actions of the congregants seemed, in fact, to be something quite the opposite, at least of the person was not of “Our Church”. The insistence was that we were not to love those who were outside the faith, as they were apostate and “not really human”, well, that was never said, but that was the feeling one got.

My problem was that Y’shua had dealt with just that phenomenon. His comment was that “Publicans love their own, what benefit to us if we behaved no better?” That’s a paraphrase, but then everything read from the manuscripts is paraphrased in order for us to understandJesus the wording and syntax of the sentences. But, there it is, what do we benefit if we behave in a manner that is like those who follow no spiritual path of any kind?

In my explorations after that, I found that the Buddhists as a rule were more obedient to those teachings than those who followed the Christ. It was in looking at why they were obedient to Christ, when Christ’s own seemed unable, that I began to realize that there is this “position” that the human spirit adapts all too easily. That is, “I am right, you are wrong, you must suffer.”  This way of looking at the position of others as ”wrongness” that somehow affects one’s own well-being, indeed, seems rampant in the Western world.

Such an attitudes still puzzles me. There seem to be two extremes here in the West. Either there is an intense caring of what others think to the intent to control those thoughts, or be controlled by them, or there is an extreme diffidence that borders on a sort of personality disorder of detachment from all connection with others; neither is healthy. If we maintain an attitude of what I have learned to think of as compassionate detachment, we can cope with the daily struggle without letting it overload us.

So, what is that? It’s the willingness to look at the behavior of others as “their issue”, knowing that there is little we can do to “make” them see the world differently without some manipulation of their world or ours, while deeply caring that they are happy in so far as it lies within our purvue. Happiness comes from within. We cannot “make” someone else truly happy. We can do our best to please them, or at least not to offend them, but we cannot make them feel contentment within. That is something they must discover for themselves.

I still don’t know why we are so bound in this part of the world to insist that others live their lives by our rules. The only thing that makes any buffalowhite3sense to me is that it is quite possible the unhappy one has chosen a life other than the one they truly wanted in order to meet someone else’s expectations, and the “different one’s” choice to live an idiosyncratic life hits a soreness within. That is sad. But it makes a sort of strange sense, doesn’t it?

It is for this reason that I respect a Native American teaching imparted to me by my Lakota and Shawnee teachers. “Follow your own truth”. You are expected to do this prayerfully and respectfully of others, but you are expected to find the path you are to walk from within yourself, not from what others want of you. It seems to me to be a right way to live. I hope someday our culture will evolve enough to teach that to our children.

The Parasol ~

The Parasol

A parasol is not an umbrella. An umbrella protects from the rain, while a parasol protects from the sun. The parasol also symbolically protects against “the heat of defilements.” Another way to look at it is that the parasol represents the sky and the handle represents a mountain that holds up the sky, or possibly the axis that holds up the whole world. The proximity of the person under the parasol to the “axis of the world” represents the importance of the person.

Still another way of looking at it is that the dome of the parasol represents wisdom, and the hanging part symbolized compassion. The parasol as a whole represents the fusion of both.

Guess who is usually shown sitting under a parasol? Two points if you guessed “The Buddha.” However, other important figures, such as the Dalai Lama and others are entitled to parasols as well.

parasolI have chuckled at the Traveler’s Insurance ads, as they use this concept quite effectively to show the protection of carrying their insurance. The concept revolves around the idea that a life lived in kindness is, in and of itself, a protection from much adversity. When you live mindful of the needs of others, and attempt at all times to be gentle and compassionate, life is easier for all concerned. In fact, this goes back to the idea that life on this plane of existence is full of suffering and sorrow, and it is among the Eight commendations by the Buddha on doing your part as an individual to relieve that suffering.

Though, in a world as paranoid as the 21st Century in the United States, this is not always the case, being kind will usually “oil” the squeaks and moans of the wheel of life as it turns. The Dalai Lama has even commented on the fact that if you are consistently kind,you will usually have few actual enemies. I have found it a point of extreme sadness that this teaching, which Y’shua repeatedly iterated, seems to have been skipped in the practice of modern fundamental Christianity. If you are busy mindfully conducting yourself in a manner that aims to sow compassion and gentleness, you learn to speak even harsh truths in a manner that will bring about thoughtful living, rather than condemnation.

Most people do not wish to be unkind, in fact, when you get to the source of unkindness, it is usually pain of some form or another. Physical pain that burrows into a person’s ability to think and respond clearly, or emotional pain that is just as wicked in it’s injuries to the soul, leading to a need to always be on the defensive with others. It is only when one attempts to be mindful at all times, even when one suffers from these pains, that an easement is found in any given situation.stickers_thumbnail

Imagine what the world would be like if each of us did our best, every day, to be fair in our dealings with people and in the things we do!”

I found this website in my search for a “Golden ruler” to point out the wording of Y’shua’s teachings. What a lovely reminder for each of us to live the Golden Path as taught by Y’shua. I love this, and find it a healthy comment that perhaps more who follow Y’shua are finding that his path was the most important part of his ministry. I have long considered his teachings a path toward the light, and it has been a heart breaker when I have found preachers and teachers of his path teaching others things like, “You don’t have to forgive in order to be forgiven,” {See the Lord’s Prayer}, You only have to be kind and honest to those who are members of your own faith or congregation, EEEEEEEK! Why would you teach that? Even those who have no faith in any sort of Spiritual path are kind and honest their own!

P.S. I will soon be back to posting regularly, I have been occupied with a visit from loving friends from back home, and along with our electrical problems {now fixed} have been busy catching up, thank you for your patience.

Su

Demonization ~

gandalf_largeOne of the most frustrating factors in research regarding belief systems and that which was before the current “regime”, is that whatever religion now “reigns supreme” takes it unto themselves to demonize all that came before. That is, perhaps, a large part of the fascination for me with the LOTR cast of characters. Tolkein and C. S. Lewis were quite good friends, and part of a group of literatti that met to encourage and critique each other’s works. Hence we have some excellent tales winding ancient lore into fantasy landscapes that satisfy as much because of the depth of understanding held by the author of the character types of which he was writing.

The Gandalf character is, of course, one of the most fascinating. He is an “Istari”, meaning he comes from the first circle of creation and is quite literally a “star” in the making. Was this how Tolkein saw the Christ? I am not sure, he most certainly never said, when asked such questions he would lower his pipe, like Gandalf above and smile, saying it is fantasy, enjoy it for what it is.

Yet, when you look most closely at the Carpenter from Nazareth, you find a gentle spoken man whose understanding of the principles on which the Universe was built, and the core of 1_robewhat humans are supposed to be to one another, are so immense that one has no difficulty twisting his teachings, and tweaking them in such a way as to make an entirely new religion out of them. That wasn’t his goal, you know. He had no intention of making Jews into Gentiles. His intent was to create an awareness of the very meaning behind every one of the more than 600 mitzvot. He wanted his own to be practicing their faith as loving and being loved by a most caring and present G-d.

I often wonder just which words were “judiciously” added by the bishops of Constantine. Which others were twisted? And why was it necessary in their eyes to make him hate the Jews, his own people? That is the perspective I dislike most about the Gospels that came from that meeting. How could you twist a man’s love for his own people into something so insidiously destructive? But they did. So it became acceptable to harrass those of Judaic descent. That is not acceptable in my book. Nor should it be in any one else’s.

But then, those of Jewish descent were not to mix with those who worshipped pagan gods, being told that Hashem was a jealous G-d. I accept that that is what Moshe understood from 2355950068_e149513456what he was shown, I simply have difficulty with that emotive expression belonging to the Most High. And yes, I suspect that much of the revelation Moshe received was visual. The words were most likely his own. He simply did not understand that jealousy stems from insecurity, and Hashem was not insecure, simply trying to show him that these that were being worshipped as high and “in charge” were lesser spirits.

But . . . . . . therein lies the rub, so to speak. A lesser spirit is not necessarily an evil spirit. I will put a caution here, generally the Most High’s servants and companions will point to the Most High and tell you that is where you center your worship, so if you find that they accept actual worship, they are not “good”. There are many spirits in the universe that are in what could loosely be called the “neutral zone”, being neither wholly evil, nor being totally dedicated to that which is high and holy. Their world is gray, and if you choose to deal with them, you must be very sure of where you are going and what you are doing.

During my search for a pic of Pan, I found a website that was entitled tvisnotforChristians. Oh dear, I suspect that this is authored by a group of ascetics, I did not check it out thoroughly enough to say that with any authority, but please be careful. Condemnation is something no true follower of either the Buddha or the Christ can afford. We are to walk our own path, measuring our strides not by the strides of others, but by our own faltering steps of yesterday. If we are doing better at following the teachings, then we are making progress. If we are not, we need to get back on track. Do not ever measure your progress by others. And do not call that which is good, evil, you will be committing a sin that cannot be forgiven.

Balance and Blessings,

Su

The Magi ~

xmas-magi2In St. Luke’s retelling of the legendary beginnings of the rabbi Y’shua, there is an oft repeated tale of a visit by three “wise men” of the time whose astral calculations told them of the birth of a specially anointed child. Their path to get to him is not recorded among our literature, though one could wish it had been. Hollywood has speculated on that journey,  the story carries all the romance and intrigue one would desire in a good tale. What they embody for us is an allegorical journey toward the light.

I have said before that I do not see Y’shua as G-d incarnate. Yet, neither do I see him as an ordinary man. I see him as a type of Buddha, a mentor in Spirit upon whom we can call for enlightenment, and even assistance when needed. I have never doubted the strength and possibilities of faith. Y’shua often said to those he ministered to that their own faith had made them whole. That is pretty incredible, for it implies that we live well below our full potential. Many times he said to those who listened to him that they could become like him. He wasn’t wanting followers to bow to his “glory”, he was wanting brothers to walk at his side, doing the deeds he did, from that time unto the present. If I understand that correctly, we have certainly missed the boat.

I had wondered about his mission’s failure to bring about the kind of living among the common man that he intended, and what he planned on doing about it until I read about a wonderful Jewish teacher called the Baal Shem Tov. I suspect, if that’s him, that he has things well in hand, and will keep coming back and teaching us silly folk until we get it right, for which I am most grateful. Until we understand that the walk along the path is as important as getting there;  that how we live each day of our lives, giving, loving, laughing and being true to Spirit is what we are supposed to do, not beat each other over the head or kill for the sake of religion; he will just have to keep coming back to teach each new generation, hoping that someday we get it right.

In the meanwhile, the best thing that we can do is celebrate the greatest gift, the gift of Love. As Spirit teaches us, through Y’shua, through the Baal Shem Tov, through Shakyamuni Buddha, through Ptesin Win, through Mother Theresa, how to love, we can learn each step of the way, to be kind, to be helpful, to be faithful to our teachers. Many blessings to you this season, no matter which Holy Days you observe!

swags2

The Occult ~

occult. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Retrieved November 04, 2008, from Dictionary.com website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/occult

harrywithnimbus1The above link gives a variety of meanings for the word “occult”, as you can see if you click on that link, it can mean something with a hidden aspect to it. Having practiced nursing, this is how I think of the word, not as something automatically evil. I have enjoyed the Harry Potter series, for the same reasons others have as well as the fact that Rowlings chooses to show that those who practice that way of life, (though not usually as instantly powerful as shown in the movies,) are the same as the rest of us, some are good, some are dark, and there are those who are somewhere in between.

I am quite aware that the OT says that one should not “suffer a witch to live”, but I also know is says the same about disobedient children. If you go around stoning your children you will be arrested and tried for child abuse, deservedly. I do not practice “witchcraft” per se, because I have no interest in controlling the elements. I also eschew the intent to control others, having seen that this is a form of craft all it’s own, whether it is of the “witchy” sort or not.

The “hidden” information that interests me most is herbal, and that which is st-johns-wortconnected with self-growth on the spiritual plane. I have seen questions regarding the idea that doing pathwork is following a cult. By the old definition, i.e. a religious group of any sort, that would apply. Beyond that it fails. Those of us who do pathwork are interested in spiritual growth, by and large, and have learned not to look at what our neighbor or friend is doing or receiving, at least as any kind of comparison for ourselves.

Pathwork is always personal. This is an individual’s struggle to grow beyond one’s own boundaries and limitations. I am free to join any church I should find enjoyable or would fit into my particular interpretation of the cosmos. Many who do pathwork also believe that Y’shua was G-d incarnate, I don’t happen to believe that, so I am not a Trinitarian. Were there a Hamayim (Gentiles who believe in Hashem, as do the Jews) congregation near me, I would probably join them in worship.

This weblog is not an official representation of anyone else’s pathwork, it is my own, and how I have managed to stay somewhat sane, even though I do hear voices. I blog for others who also hear voices, some of whom live back in Indiana, where I come from, so that if they wanted other readers here to know they were also voicehearers they would comment on that for all to see. If my path is of any help at all to others, I am delighted, if it is not, I hope that you find a path that suits your needs, and may Hashem bless all of your days.

Su

tibetan-eternity-knot1P.S. One of the things I would prefer to see stopped is the Christian tendency to label anything from any other religion “occult”, Buddhism is not hidden, nor is Hinduism, nor Jainism, (and a whole bunch more,) these are religions in their own right, and the practitioners of these faiths deserve to be treated with the same respect as all other humans.

Y’shua and the Tree ~

I wonder if you can copyright just a title? I like the sound of “Y’shua and the Tree”, but haven’t yet written the entire book. Oh well, if someone beats me to it, and is consistent to the tree teachings of Y’shua, it’s OK. Y’shua often told his listeners simply to “be good trees”, and was pretty specific about what constituted a good tree.

A good tree bore good fruit, fruit that was edible and nourishing for the one eating it. A bad tree bore bad fruit, fruit that would not nourish, but would eventually destroy the consumer. This meant that not only was it important for the believer to make sure that the “fruit” growing from his life was nourishing to himself, but to others as well.

So, how do we go about being a “good tree”. Well, the system was not in place when Y’shua taught, as far as I can tell, but the teachings were all there. So, what did he expect of those who would be there when he was gone? Well, first they needed to recognize in him a good teacher, one who told them things they needed to hear, then he expected them to be good students, listening to the teacher and absorbing his teachings well enough to teach others.

If the student listened and absorbed, he would begin to walk a beautiful path of joyful, humble service to others, giving generously of himself, forgiving generously of others’ mistakes, and caring deeply for the needs of all those around him. His compassion would be deep, while his self-discipline would gird him for the toughness of a life path that was demanding and grueling, yet immensely rewarding. As he grew in understanding and wisdom, he would also begin to discern how to be exactly where he was needed and what he needed to do. This, then, is when he begins to enter into the flow of Creator’s will.

In a very brief and oversimplified statement, this is the path of Kabbalah, or receiving. It is a beautiful path, despite the silliness of the fundies in calling it a cult. I have been quite amused at that, as it is the pot calling the kettle black, but, hey, to each his own.

So, how can you tell if the person is real? Well, I believe John answered that, somewhere in the 15th chapter of his book, that’s where Y’shua gives his final “plant” teaching, (though I believe he said “The I Am,” rather than “I Am”, just a little mistranslation that changes the meaning of everything said), only this time he speaks of the vine and branches, and also that if one is loving, and caring, others would know that they belonged to the I AM, this makes much sense to me, as that is how one knows a Buddhist’s sincerity, or a Taoists, or a Native American’s, they are genuine and loving. And they belong to the “Tao” or “Wakan Tanka” or venerate the “Bodhi tree” from which Buddha received his wisdom.

Ehyeh Asher Ehyeh

Ever present and eternal,

maker of the stars that shine,

present in the light of mind,

living in the very air we breathe.

But, you see, like my master before me, I have no desire for you to create a new religion with these words, only to have a new understanding of the oldest and greatest, and the Everpresent’s love for you.

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