A voicehearer’s path ~

Posts tagged ‘ceremony’

Ceremony ~

Just what need does ceremony fulfill, since Hashem really does not need it, it is for us. That’s why it doesn’t bother the Holy One if one of us sings a Lakota song to the Sacred Prayer Pipe, or another of us throws himself on an altar with a white cloth and cross on it. It took me a long time to realize that Hashem didn’t care where or how you worshiped, so long as you were not worshiping the darker tendencies of evil, or the temporal silliness that is here today, and gone tomorrow. Matt 12:

31 And so I tell you, people will be forgiven every sin and blasphemy. But blasphemy against the Spirit will not be forgiven. 32 Anyone who speaks a word against the Son of Man will be forgiven, but anyone who speaks against the Holy Spirit will not be forgiven, either in this age or in the age to come.

33 “Make a tree good and its fruit will be good, or make a tree bad and its fruit will be bad, for a tree is recognized by its fruit. 34 You brood of vipers, how can you who are evil say anything good? For out of the overflow of the heart the mouth speaks. 35 Good people bring good things out of the good stored up in them, and evil people bring evil things out of the evil stored up in them. 36 But I tell you that people will have to give account on the day of judgment for every empty word they have spoken. 37 For by your words you will be acquitted, and by your words you will be condemned.”

Hashem honors prayer whether it comes from a child or an elder, a Buddhist or a Seventh Day Adventist, so long as it is spoken in compassion and love. In fact, whatever you put forth will come back to you, so I am not sure dark prayers are not honored as well, but you will be held responsible for them.

It also took me a long time to realize that since prayer is our line of communication with the divine, the very fact that sincere deep prayers for healing are answered no matter their source, our religion, the outer trappings of what we wear and what we do, has absolutely nothing to do with G-d’s perspective when looking at us. What is seen when we pray is the heart. G-d does not care if you are a Christian, “Do you love?” God does not care if you are a Buddhist, “Are you kind?” God does not care if you are Muslim, “Do you love your fellow human beings from deep inside your very being?”

The “Sin against the Holy Spirit” is calling an answered prayer from a Buddhist an answer from the Devil, because they are not of your faith. The sin spoken of here is to call that which is good evil, and that which is evil good. That doesn’t change whether you are Jain or Native American. The ceremony you use when you pray is to help you focus your prayers. That is all it serves. What is in your heart? If it is good, your prayers will be good, and your faith will be honored.

Blood ~

According to the OT the life of an animal is in the blood. Since this is also a physical truth, there are few who would argue this point. It would seem, then, that this is the basis for the blood sacrifices in many religions, and indeed, in Judaism before the destruction of the temple and the dispersion.

Yet, according to the prophet (I Sam 15:22), Hashem prefers obedience to sacrifice. So it behooves us to examine what that obedience is, and, if possible begin to attempt to live that way. There are 613 Mitzvot, or commandments on how to conduct one’s life if one is living under Hashem’s covenant with Moshe, or Moses. An examination of these commandments confirms Y’shua’s teaching that all of them, with few exceptions, are about living in peace and compassion with one’s fellow man. It would seem then, that obedience would mean to have compassion, at all times and in all places, for one’s fellow creatures.

So, how is it that in Christian teaching it is more important that you accept that Y’shua made of his own body a blood sacrifice for your sins, yet you do not have to live in obedience to his one commandment to love? This is the basis of why I walked away from the church as I knew it. (I have come since then to realize that not all Christian churches teach this, there are those that teach that both are necessary.)

Yet, if the prophet was correct, Hashem did not require the blood sacrifice of a g-d-man, Hashem only required we listen to the rabbi’s teachings to love. So, if indeed Y’shua’s sacrifice was for us, it was from our perspective, not the perspective of The Ancient of Days. The Holy One wants only that we learn to be compassionate with one another, for the rabbi said that the most important command was to love G-d and love your fellow man.

Yes, I know I am a broken record on this point, but it is the point. There is no other point. According to the Dalai Lama, the real point of religion is to fill our hearts with compassion for one another. I have to agree wholeheartedly, it is because of this man’s teachings, and the teachings of Shakyamuni Buddha, that I consider myself a Buddhist Christian. I, in fact, have come to glean those teachings of Y’shua’s about compassion and love as the only ones I count as true to his mission. I suspect the rest were added by very human individuals with agendas that were not G-d’s!

It is not Hashem who needs all the ceremony, it is humans. I suspect that the most spiritual among us may be the child that reaches out to another creature, any creature. It is here we see genuine joy and interaction that heals. Forget the blood sacrifices, go let your inner child out to play, perhaps then you will know true spirituality. (Luke 18:15-17)

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